landsea words

Words taken  from Archaelogical Assessment 

Herstmonceux  Dr Scott Mclean, Bader Centre

 

moated medieval site

canal stream wet ditch

loam clay silt sand gravel

woodland

wild forest

(Unlikely many people lived in forests)

shinewater

salt-making

shallow bay small islands deserted villages moated farmsteads

water sources water sources shoreline

(remained under water until about the 13th Century)

brushwood earthworks marsh crofts

parks ponds water courses

lily ponds moat stream land

stream field water course road

park pond stream

fields moats ditches moat

sandy soil heavy soil rocky ground

fieldwork

plants

trenches trench trench trench

fieldwork

pylons power lines

water-filled moat

spring

dry ditch

earthworks

trench

sand stone flint cobbles 

Mica Schist pot sherds

dry ditch top soils

dark humid soil

ground

pit

stones

oyster shells 

burnt clay

bones 

bedrock

Pevensey Levels

open flat low lying landforms

siltstone mudstone sandstone

rising sea level

glaciation

tidal estuary

flood

alluvium

shallow bay

shorelines below sea level shoreline

marine clay freshwater clay

silts sands gravels storm beach shingle

loamy clayey

ground water

clays silts mudstone sandstone

streams ditches drains straight ditches moats water course

woodland scrub trees ditches vegetation trench

trench damage destroyed

field fieldwork field 

trench trench trench trench  trench

fish ponds ditch ditch

barbed wire backdirt 

wood bark

brushwood

flint flakes

sod 

sod clay wood bark silt sand charcoal ironstone sandstone clay loam ash burnt wood

sea defences

Willingdon Levels

colour of finds

orange red brown dark grey to brown mid brown grey red dark brown black grey brown light to brown and yellow yellow, yellowish to white dark brown yellowish brown grey grey blue black

some bones

partial sheep’s jawbone with four teeth

small pieces of oyster shell

sternum from sheep butcher marks where ribs removed

small pieces likely fowl

small pieces of rib

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